An analysis of the canterbury tales by geoffrey chaucer

Whan that Aprill with his shoures soote The droghte of March hath perced to the roote. See Important Quotations Explained The narrator opens the General Prologue with a description of the return of spring.

An analysis of the canterbury tales by geoffrey chaucer

Chaucer himself is one of the pilgrims.

An analysis of the canterbury tales by geoffrey chaucer

That evening, the Host of the Tabard Inn suggests that each member of the group tell tales on the way to and from Canterbury in order to make the time pass more pleasantly. The person who tells the best story will be awarded an elegant dinner at the end of the trip.

The Host decides to accompany the party on its pilgrimage and appoints himself as the judge of the best tale. Shortly after their departure the day, the pilgrims draw straws.

The Knight, who draws the shortest straw, agrees to tell the first story — a noble story about knights and honor and love.

SparkNotes: The Canterbury Tales: General Prologue: Introduction

When the Knight finishes his story, the Host calls upon the Monk. The drunken Miller, however, insists that it is his turn, and he proceeds to tell a story about a stupid carpenter. At the end of his story, everyone roars with laughter — except the Reeve, who had once been a carpenter.

To get back at the Miller, the Reeve tells a lowbrow story about a cheating miller. At the end of The Reeve's Tale, the Cook, Roger, promises to tell a true story, but he doesn't complete his tale.

By now, the first day is rapidly passing, and the Host hurries the pilgrims to get on with their tales. Using the best legalese that he knows, he calls upon the Man of Law for the next tale.

The Man of Law proceeds to tell the tale of Constancy. The Host is very pleased with the tale and asks the Parson to relate another one just as good.

The Parson declines, however, and rebukes the Host for swearing and ridiculing him the Parson. The Shipman breaks in and tells a lively story to make up for so much moralizing.

The Wife of Bath is the next to tell a story, and she begins by claiming that happy marriages occur only when a wife has sovereignty over her husband. When the Wife of Bath finishes her story, the Friar offers his own tale about a summoner.

An analysis of the canterbury tales by geoffrey chaucer

The Host, however, always the peacekeeper, admonishes the Friar to let the Summoner alone. The Summoner interrupts and says the Friar can do as he likes and will be repaid with a tale about a friar.

Nevertheless, the Friar's tale about a summoner makes the Summoner so angry that he tells an obscene story about the fate of all friars and then continues with an obscene tale about one friar in particular.

After the Friar and Summoner finish their insulting stories about each other, the Host turns to the Clerk and asks for a lively tale. The Clerk tells a story about Griselda and her patience — a story that depicts the exact opposite of The Wife of Bath's Tale.

The Merchant comments that he has no wife as patient and sweet as Griselda and tells of tale of a young wife who cheats on her old husband. After the Merchant's tale, the Host requests another tale about love and turns to the Squire, who begins a tale of supernatural events.

He does not finish, however, because the Franklin interrupts him to compliment the Squire on his eloquence and gentility. The Host, interested only get in getting the next story told, commands the Franklin to begin his tale, which he does. The Franklin tells of a happy marriage.The Canterbury Tales (Middle English: Tales of Caunterbury) is a collection of 24 stories that runs to over 17, lines written in Middle English by Geoffrey Chaucer between and In , Chaucer became Controller of Customs and Justice of Peace and, in , Clerk of the King's work.

A summary of General Prologue: Introduction in Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales. Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Canterbury Tales and what it means.

Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans. The Narrator - The narrator makes it quite clear that he is also a character in his ashio-midori.comgh he is called Chaucer, we should be wary of accepting his words and opinions as Chaucer’s own.

In the General Prologue, the narrator presents himself as a gregarious and naïve character. The Canterbury Tales is a collection of stories by Geoffrey Chaucer that was first published in Chaucer begins a story about Sir Topas but is soon interrupted by the Host, who exclaims that he is tired of the jingling rhymes and wants Chaucer to tell a little something in prose.

Chaucer complies with the boring story of Melibee. Summary Chaucer tells the reader that The Canterbury Tales are meant to give an overview of human nature; to be an encyclopedia of human behavior.

The author does not want to be seen as a judge of.

The Canterbury Tales Chaucer's Retraction Summary and Analysis - ashio-midori.com