An in depth look at ptolemys creation of the first geocentric model of the solar system

Physical Science The geocentric model of the solar system and indeed of the universe asserts that the earth sits, unmoving, at the centre of all existence.

An in depth look at ptolemys creation of the first geocentric model of the solar system

The Scientific Revolution, which took place in the 16th and 17th centuries, was a time of unprecedented learning and discovery. During this period, the foundations of modern science were laid, thanks to breakthroughs in the fields of physics, mathematics, chemistry, biology, and astronomy.

And when it comes to astronomy, the most influential scholar was definitely Nicolaus Copernicusthe man credited with the creation of the Heliocentric model of the Universe. In so doing, he resolved the mathematical problems and inconsistencies arising out of the classic geocentric model and laid the foundations for modern astronomy.

While Copernicus was not the first to propose a model of the Solar System in which the Earth and planets revolved around the Sun, his model of a heliocentric universe was both novel and timely.

For one, it came at a time when European astronomers were struggling to resolve the mathematical and observational problems that arose out of the then-accepted Ptolemaic model of the Universe, a geocentric model proposed in the 2nd century CE. Not only did his model resolves issues arising out of the Ptolemaic system, it offered a simplified view of the universe that did away with complicated mathematical devices that were needed for the geocentric model to work.

And with time, the model gained influential proponents who contributed to it becoming the accepted convention of astronomy. An illustration of the Ptolemaic geocentric system by Portuguese cosmographer and cartographer Bartolomeu Velho, The geocentric model, in which planet Earth is the center of the Universe and is circled by the Sun and all the planets, had been the accepted cosmological model since ancient times.

The geocentric model essentially came down to two common observations. First of all, to ancient astronomers, the stars, the Sun, and the planets appeared to revolve around the Earth on daily basis. Second, from the perspective of the Earth-bound observer, the Earth did not appear to move, making it a fixed point in space.

The belief that the Earth was spherical, which became an accepted fact by the 3rd century BCE, was incorporated into this system. As such, by the time of Aristotle, the geocentric model of the universe became one where the Earth, Sun and all the planets were spheres, and where the Sun, planets and stars all moved in perfect circular motions.

However, it was not until Egyptian-Greek astronomer Claudius Ptolemaeus aka.

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Ptolemy released his treatise Almagest in the 2nd century BCE that the details became standardized. Drawing on centuries of astronomical traditions, ranging from Babylonian to modern times, Ptolemy argued that the Earth was in the center of the universe and the stars were all at a modest distance from the center of the universe.

An in depth look at ptolemys creation of the first geocentric model of the solar system

NASA Each planet in this system is also moved by a system of two spheres — a deferent and an epicycle. The deferent is a circle whose center point is removed from the Earth, which was used to account for the differences in the lengths of the seasons.

The purpose of he epicycle was to account for retrograde motionwhere planets in the sky appear to be slowing down, moving backwards, and then moving forward again. Unfortunately, these explanations did not account for all the observed behaviors of the planets.

An in depth look at ptolemys creation of the first geocentric model of the solar system

While this system remained the accepted cosmological model within the Roman, Medieval European and Islamic worlds for over a thousand years, it was unwieldy by modern standards.

However, it did manage to predict planetary motions with a fair degree of accuracy, and was used to prepare astrological and astronomical charts for the next years. By the 16th century, this model was gradually superseded by the heliocentric model of the universe, as espoused by Copernicus, and then Galileo and Kepler.

In the 16th century, Nicolaus Copernicus began devising his version of the heliocentric model. Like others before him, Copernicus built on the work of Greek astronomer Atistarchus, as well as paying homage to the Maragha school and several notable philosophers from the Islamic world see below.

ByCopernicus began circulating copies amongst his friends, many of whom were fellow astronomers and scholars. This forty-page manuscript described his ideas about the heliocentric hypothesis, which was based on seven general principles. These principles stated that: Celestial bodies do not all revolve around a single point The center of Earth is the center of the lunar sphere—the orbit of the moon around Earth All the spheres rotate around the Sun, which is near the center of the Universe The distance between Earth and the Sun is an insignificant fraction of the distance from Earth and Sun to the stars, so parallax is not observed in the stars The stars are immovable — their apparent daily motion is caused by the daily rotation of Earth Earth is moved in a sphere around the Sun, causing the apparent annual migration of the Sun.

In it, he advanced his seven major arguments, but in more detailed form and with detailed computations to back them up.

A comparison of the geocentric and heliocentric models of the universe.The geocentric model, in which planet Earth is the center of the Universe and is circled by the Sun and all the planets, had been the accepted cosmological model since ancient times. The geocentric model of the universe, in which the Sun, planets and stars revolved around the Earth, was the accepted view of the cosmos for millennia.

Kepler, Newton, ptolemy, Solar System. Layout of the Solar System The Scale of the Solar System The Creation of Heavy Elements Ptolemy and the Geocentric Model. Scientists of the s and s inherited a model of the universe whose basic features had been defined by Aristotle 2, years earlier.

The idea was simple. Earth was stationary at the center and the . The geocentric model of the solar system (and indeed of the universe) asserts that the earth sits, unmoving, at the centre of all existence. Every other object in the sky revolves around the earth, following paths dictated by a variety of mathematical rules – some of them quite complex!

the geocentric model: a round Earth at the centre of a celestial sphere Used model to determine layout of solar system, with planetary distances in astronomical units (AU) - 2.

Science progresses through the creation and testing of models of nature that explain the observations as simply as possible - 3. A scientific model must make.

NASA’s exploration spans the universe. Observing the sun and its effects on Earth. Delving deep into our solar system. Looking beyond to worlds around other stars.

Probing the mysterious structures and origins of our universe. Everywhere imaginable, NASA is out there.

What Is The Heliocentric Model Of The Universe? - Universe Today